Tip: Test for Tables Missing from Permission Sets

In PowerShell:

$tablesInPermissionSets = @()

$permissionSets = gci . -Recurse -Filter '*.al' | ? {(gc $_.FullName).Item(0).startsWith('permissionset')}
 $permissionSets | % {
    $content = gc $_.FullName -Raw
    [Regex]::Matches($content, '(?<=tabledata ).*(?= =)') | % {
        $tablesInPermissionSets += $_.Value
    }
 }

$tablesInTables = @()

$tables = gci . -Recurse -Filter '*.al' | Where-Object {(Get-Content $_.FullName).Item(0).StartsWith('table ')}
 $tables | % {
    $content = gc $_.FullName -Raw
    [Regex]::Matches($content, "(?<=table \d+ ).*(?=$([Environment]::NewLine))") | % {
        $tablesInTables += $_.Value
    }
 }

$missingTables = ""

Compare-Object $tablesInTables $tablesInPermissionSets | ? SideIndicator -eq '<=' | % {
    $missingTables += $_.InputObject + [Environment]::NewLine
}

if ('' -ne $missingTables) {
    throw "Missing table permissions: $missingTables"
}

In English:

  1. Find all the files in the current folder, and child folders, with a filename ending in .al and which have a first line starting with “permissionset”
  2. Build a collection of the tabledata objects that are referenced in those permission sets
  3. Find all the files in the current folder, and child folders, with a filename ending in .al and which have a first line starting with “table ” (with a space to avoid matching “tableextension”)
  4. Build a collection of the names of the tables
  5. Use Compare-Object to compare the collections and find names which appear in the list of tables but not in tabledata permissions
  6. Build an error message of missing table permissions
  7. Throw the error

PowerShell Profile:

Like most small PowerShell scripts that I write, I’ve just added it to my PowerShell profile. Run code $profile in a PowerShell prompt to open the profile file in VS Code.

function Test-Permissions() {
  #...all of the above code
}

Maybe there is already a VS Code extension that checks for this? It would make sense, but I’m pretty minimalist with the extensions that I have installed anyway. I run it from the terminal in VS Code.

Tip: Install all Apps in a Folder to a Container

Intro

I do this fairly often to prep a new (local) container for development. The script needs to be run on the Docker host and assumes that the PowerShell prompt is already at the folder containing the apps (or apps in child folders) you want to install.

Use the dev endpoint if you are going to want to publish the same apps from VS Code into the container. Or publish into the global scope if you prefer – maybe if you are creating an environment for testing.

Publishing to Dev Scope Using Dev Endpoint

$container = Read-Host -Prompt 'Container'; $credential = Get-Credential; Sort-AppFilesByDependencies -appFiles (gci . -Recurse -Filter *.app | % {$_.FullName}) | % {try{Publish-BcContainerApp $container -appFile $_ -sync -upgrade -skipVerification -useDevEndpoint -credential $credential} catch {Publish-BcContainerApp $container -appFile $_ -sync -install -skipVerification -useDevEndpoint -credential $credential}}

Publishing to Global Scope

$container = Read-Host -Prompt 'Container'; Sort-AppFilesByDependencies -appFiles (gci . -Recurse -Filter *.app | % {$_.FullName}) | % {try{Publish-BcContainerApp $container -appFile $_ -sync -upgrade -skipVerification} catch {Publish-BcContainerApp $container -appFile $_ -sync -install -skipVerification}}

Tip: List-Commits

function List-Commits {
  cd 'C:\Git'
  $Commits = @()
  Get-ChildItem . -Directory | % {
    cd "$_"
    if (Test-Path (Join-Path (Get-Location) '.git')) {
      $Commits += git log --all --format="$($_)~%h~%ai~%s~%an" | ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter '~' -Header ('Project,Hash,Date,Message,Author'.Split(','))
    }
    cd ..
  }
  $Commits | ? Author -EQ "$(git config --get user.name)" | sort Date -Descending | Out-GridView -Title 'Commits'
}

This function iterates through Git repositories under the same parent folder (C:\Git in my case), builds a list of all the commits that you’ve authored (i.e. that match your user.name in Git config) and displays them in descending date order in a grid view.

Change the path in the second line to suit, or just remove it to have it search for repositories under the current directory.

Sample output in a PowerShell grid view

I use it to remind myself what I’ve been working on over the last few days. Mostly for fun and only occasionally because I’m late filling in my timesheets… 🙄

Tip: Remove-BranchesWithUpstreamGone

Wait, I Thought I Deleted That Branch?

One of the things that I found counter-intuitive when I was getting started with Git is that when branches are deleted on the server they are still present in your local repository, even after you have fetched from the server.

We typically delete the source branch when completing a pull request, so this happens a lot. Usually, once the PR has been completed I want to:

  1. remove the reference to the deleted remote branch
  2. remove the corresponding local branch

Removing Remote Reference

The reference to the remote branch is removed when you run git fetch with the prune switch.

git fetch --prune
Fetching origin
From <remote url>
- [deleted] (none) -> origin/test

Removing Local Branches

Local branches can be removed with the git branch command. Adding -d first checks for unmerged commits and will not delete the branch if there are any commits which are only in the branch that is being deleted. Adding -D overrides the check and deletes the branch anyway.

git branch -d test
Deleted branch test (was <commit hash>)

Remove-BranchesWithUpstreamGone

I’ve added a couple of PowerShell functions to my profile file – which means they are always available in my terminal. If I’m working on an app and I know that some PR’s have been merged I can clean up my workspace running Remove-BranchesWithUpstreamGone in VS Code’s terminal.

As a rule, I don’t need to keep any branches which used to have a copy of the server, but don’t any more (indicated by [gone] in the list of branches). Obviously, local branches which have never been pushed to the server won’t be deleted.

function Remove-BranchesWithUpstreamGone {
  (Get-BranchesWithUpstreamGone) | ForEach-Object {
    Write-Host "Removing branch $_"
    git branch $_ -D
  }
}

function Get-BranchesWithUpstreamGone {
  git fetch --all --prune | Out-Null
  $Branches = git branch -v | Where-Object { $_.Contains('[gone]') }
  $BranchNames += $Branches | ForEach-Object {
    if ($_.Split(' ').Item(1) -ne '') {
      $_.Split(' ').Item(1)
    }
    else {
      $_.Split(' ').Item(2)
    }
  }

  $BranchNames
}

Get Errors from a Docker Container Event Log

“You cannot sign in due to a technical issue. Contact your system administrator.”

Business Central

Terrific. This is in a local Docker container, so I am the system administrator. Give me a second while I contact myself…

…nope, myself didn’t know what the problem was either.

It could be that the license has expired, maybe there is something wrong with the tenant, the service tier hasn’t been able to start, who knows? You should probably start by looking for errors in the event log of the container.

Maybe I’m missing a trick and there is an easier way to do this(?) but I look through the event log with PowerShell. You can run this command inside the container:

Get-EventLog Application -EntryType Error

That will return all the errors that have been logged in the Application log. Two problems though:

  1. The list might be massive
  2. You can’t see the full text of the messages

You can add the Newest parameter to specify the number of most recent messages that you want to return. Then you probably want to write the full text of the message so that you can actually read it.

Get-EventLog Application -EntryType Error -Newest 1 | % {$_.Message}

Cool – although you still need to open a PowerShell prompt inside the container to run those commands. It would be nice if we didn’t need to do that. We can use docker exec to run a command against a local container from the outside.

docker exec [container name] powershell 'Get-EventLog Application -EntryType Error -Newest 1 | % {$_.Message}'

Now we’re getting somewhere. But of course, you don’t want to be typing all that each time. I’ve declared a PowerShell function in my profile file (run code $profile in a PowerShell prompt to open the profile file in VS Code).

function Get-ContainerErrors {
  param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory = $true)]
    [string]$ContainerName,
    [Parameter(Mandatory = $false)]
    [int]$Newest = 1
  )
  docker exec $ContainerName powershell ("Get-EventLog Application -EntryType Error -Newest $Newest" + ' | % {$_.Message;''**********''}')
}

Declaring it in the profile file means that the function will always be available in a PowerShell prompt. The container name parameter must be supplied and optionally I can ask for more than just the latest one error. The string of asterisks is just to indicate where one log message ends and another begins.