Part 2: (Slightly) More Elegant Error Handling in Business Central

Part 2 of the series that I said that I was going to write has been a long time coming. If you don’t know what I’m talking about you might want to read the first post in the series here. Unfortunately it is possible that this series reflects the functionality that it is describing: full of early promise, but on closer inspection a little convoluted and disappointing. I’ll leave you to be the judge of that.

Unfortunately, I’ve just found the framework a little annoying to work with. Maybe I’m missing the correct way to use it but it seems like there are too many objects involved without providing the functions that I was expecting. Then again, if I am missing the best way to use it then that illustrates my point – it’s just not very friendly to work with. I’ll try to make some constructive suggestions as we go.

Scenario

A quick reminder of what we’re trying to achieve here. I’ve got a journal page to record all the video calls for work and family that I’m having.* Before the journal is posted the lines are checked for lots of potential errors. Rather than presenting the user with one error at a time we are trying to batch them all together and present them in a list to be resolved all at once. I’m using the error message handling framework to do it.

*to be clear, I’m not using it. I’m sad…but not that sad**

Overview

Some basic principles to bear in mind when dealing with the Error Message Mgt. codeunit

  1. You need to trap all the errors
    • The framework provides a way of collecting messages and displaying them to the user in a list page. It doesn’t fundamentally change how error handling in BC works. If you encounter an un-trapped error the code execution will stop, transaction be rolled back etc.
    • Obviously that includes TestField() and FieldError() calls, not just Error()
  2. The Error Message framework must be activated before calling the code that you want to trap errors for
  3. Call PushContext to set the current context for which you are handling errors
  4. Call Finish to indicate that the previous context is complete
  5. You need to determine whether there are any errors to display and then, if so, display them

Example

This is where the posting of my journal batch begins. We need to activate the error handling framework and if an error is trapped in the posting codeunit then show the errors that have been collected.

There is a ShowErrors method in the Error Message Management codeunit, but its only for on-prem. Don’t ask, I don’t know. You need to use if Codeunit.Run (or a TryFunction I suppose – although don’t) to determine whether to there are any errors to show. There is a HasErrors method in the Error Message Handler codeunit but that’s also only for on-prem. Still don’t ask.

procedure Post()
var
    VideoCallBatchPost: Codeunit "Video Call Post Batch";
    ErrorMessageMgt: Codeunit "Error Message Management";
    ErrorMessageHandler: Codeunit "Error Message Handler";
begin
    ErrorMessageMgt.Activate(ErrorMessageHandler);
    if not VideoCallBatchPost.Run(Rec) then
        ErrorMessageHandler.ShowErrors();
end;

It would have been nice if there was a way to do with without declaring an extra two codeunits – but I don’t think there is.

Onto the next level on the callstack. Call PushContext with a record that gives the context within which the errors are being collected. Run the code that we want to collect errors from and then Finish. If any errors have been encountered the Finish method will throw an error with a blank error message to ensure that the transaction is rolled back to the last commit.

If Finish is called when GuiAllowed is false then SendTraceTag is called to “send a trace tag to the telemetry service”. Interesting.

local procedure PostBatch(VideoCallBatch: Record "Video Call Batch")
var
    VideoJnlLine: Record "Video Journal Line";
    ErrorMessageMgt: Codeunit "Error Message Management";
    ErrorContextElement: Codeunit "Error Context Element";
begin
    ErrorMessageMgt.PushContext(ErrorContextElement, VideoCallBatch, 0, '');
    VideoJnlLine.SetRange("Batch Name", VideoCallBatch.Name);
    VideoJnlLine.FindSet();
    repeat
       VideoJnlLine.Post();
    until VideoJnlLine.Next() = 0;

    ErrorMessageMgt.Finish(VideoCallBatch);
end;

Now into the journal line posting and all the checks that are performed on each line. I won’t copy out the entire function – it’d be a bit tedious and you can check the source code afterwards if you’re interested.

local procedure Check(var VideoJnlLine: Record "Video Journal Line")
var
    GLSetup: Record "General Ledger Setup";
    ErrorMessageMgt: Codeunit "Error Message Management";
begin
    if VideoJnlLine."No. of Participants" = 0 then
        ErrorMessageMgt.LogErrorMessage(VideoJnlLine.FieldNo("No. of Participants"), StrSubstNo('%1 must not be 0', VideoJnlLine.FieldCaption("No. of Participants")), VideoJnlLine, VideoJnlLine.FieldNo("No. of Participants"), '');

    if VideoJnlLine."Duration (mins)" = 0 then
        ErrorMessageMgt.LogErrorMessage(VideoJnlLine.FieldNo("Duration (mins)"), StrSubstNo('%1 must not be 0', VideoJnlLine.FieldCaption("Duration (mins)")), VideoJnlLine, VideoJnlLine.FieldNo("Duration (mins)"), '');

    if VideoJnlLine."Posting Date" = 0D then
        ErrorMessageMgt.LogErrorMessage(VideoJnlLine.FieldNo("Posting Date"), StrSubstNo('%1 must be set', VideoJnlLine.FieldCaption("Posting Date")), VideoJnlLine, VideoJnlLine.FieldNo("Posting Date"), '');

This is where it really starts to get a bit messy. The TestFields are gone, replaced with calls to LogErrorMessage. LogError and LogSimpleErrorMessage are alternatives with slightly different signatures. Pass in the field no, error message, record and “help article code” related to the error and they will be collected by the framework.

If any errors have been logged then the Finish function (see above) will throw an (untrapped) error and prevent the journal from actually being posted.

Conclusion

I really tried to enjoy working with this. I’d like to have better error handling in our apps – but I don’t think we’re going to get round to introducing this sort of thing any time soon. The parameters on this method are too clunky.

  • It requires a “context” field no. and a “source” field no. – I’m still not clear what the difference is
  • I have to provide the error message text. That’s a problem. With TestField I can leave the system to generate the correct error text, in whatever language the client is set to. This way I have to create a label (I didn’t in my example because I’m lazy) and then translate it into different languages
  • I don’t know what I’m supposed to provide for “help article code”
  • I was hoping for an ErrorMessageMgt.TestField method. Couldn’t I just pass in my record and the field no. that I’m testing? I want to leave the framework to determine if an error needs to be logged and, if so, the correct text

You can view the changes that I’ve made since the first blog post here: https://github.com/jimmymcp/error-message-mgt/commit/6d768c5552c0fad433e75dea15a7d1d064cb040c

I’d love someone to tell me that I’ve missed how easy this framework is to work with and they’ve had a great time with it. It looked like it was going to be great but left me a bit flat. Like a roast potato that you’ve saved for your last mouthful at Sunday lunchtime only to discover it’s actually a parsnip.

Debugging Business Central Tests with AL Test Runner

TL;DR

  1. Install the Test Runner Service app (see https://github.com/jimmymcp/test-runner-service; direct download of the app file from here) or use the “Install Test Runner Service” command from VS Code to install into the Docker container specified in the config file
  2. Set the URL to the test runner service in the testRunnerServiceUrl key of the AL Test Runner config file
  3. Define a debug configuration of request type ‘attach’ in launch.json to attach the debugger to the service tier that you want to debug (should be the same service tier as specified by the testRunnerServiceUrl key)

Overview

From v0.4.0 of the AL Test Runner app it is possible to debug Business Central tests without leaving Visual Studio Code. There’s a lot of scope for improvements but if you’re interested in trying it out it’s included in the marketplace version now.

Test Runner Service App

This is a very simple app that exposes a codeunit as a web service to accept a codeunit ID and test name to run. Those values are passed to a test runner codeunit (codeunit isolation) to actually run the tests. This is so that the tests are executed in a session type of WebService which the debugger can attach to (the PowerShell runner creates a session type of ClientService).

The app is in the per tenant object range: 79150-79160 to be precise (a number picked pretty much at random). If that clashes with some other object ranges present in the database you can clone the repo and renumber the codeunits if you want. The source is here: https://github.com/jimmymcp/test-runner-service

You can use the Install Test Runner Service command in VS Code to automatically download the app and install into the container specified in the AL Test Runner config file.

The app is not code signed so you’ll need to use the -SkipVerification switch when you install it.

testRunnerServiceUrl

A new key is required in the AL Test Runner config file. This specifies the OData endpoint of the test runner service that is exposed by the Test Runner Service app. The service will be called from the VS Code terminal – so consider where the terminal is runner and where the service is hosted.

We develop against local Docker containers so the local VS Code instance will be able to access the web service without any trouble. If you develop against a remote Docker host make sure that the OData port is available externally. If you use VS Code remote development remember that the PowerShell session will be running on the VS Code server host.

The url will be in the format:

http[s]://[BC host]:[OData port]/[BC instance]/ODataV4/TestRunner_RunTest?company=[BC company]

for example against a local Docker container called bc with OData exposed on the default port of 7048 and a company name of CRONUS International Ltd.:

"testRunnerServiceUrl": "http://bc:7048/BC/ODataV4/TestRunner_RunTest?company=CRONUS%20International%20Ltd."

Debug Configuration

You will need a debug configuration of type attach in the launch.json file. This should attach the debugger to the same service as identified by the testRunnerServiceUrl key. breakOnNext should be set WebServiceClient. Currently UserPassword authentication is the only authentication method supported.

{
    "name": "Attach bc",
    "type": "al",
    "request": "attach",
    "server": "http://bc",
    "serverInstance": "bc",
    "authentication": "UserPassword",
    "breakOnError": true,
    "breakOnRecordWrite": false,
    "enableSqlInformationDebugger": true,
    "enableLongRunningSqlStatements": true,
    "longRunningSqlStatementsThreshold": 500,
    "numberOfSqlStatements": 10,
    "breakOnNext": "WebServiceClient"
}

Debugging

Codelens actions will be added at the top of test codeunits and before each test method. Set a breakpoint in the test method that you want to debug or allow the debugger to break on an error.

Clicking on Debug Test (Ctrl+Alt+D) will attach the first debug configuration specified in launch.json and call the web service to run the test with the Test Runner Service app.

Attaching the debugger and running a test from VS Code

Step in/out/over as usual. When the code execution has finished if an error was encountered the error message and callstack will be displayed in the terminal.

Limitations

There are some limitations to running tests in a web service session. Most importantly TestPage variables are not supported. There may also be some differences in the behaviour of tests in web services and the PowerShell runner.

Tip: Evaluating DateTime with Type Helper

Dates. What a nightmare. Day/Month/Year? Month/Day/Year? 24 hour time? 12 hour time? It’s almost enough to make you sympathetic to the idea of decimal time…almost.

Type Helper codeunit to the rescue. It has a method to allow you to evaluate the text of a date, time or datetime into the corresponding type according to a format that you specify.

AVariant := DateResult;
FormatString := 'ddMMyy';
if TypeHelper.Evaluate(AVariant, DateText, FormatString, '') then
  DateResult := AVariant

The first parameter is of type Variant. The actual data type that the variant contains determines whether the method will attempt to evaluate to a date, time or datetime. Unfortunately because that parameter is passed by reference (var) you have to declare a variant variable and then assign its value to another variable afterwards – but apart from that its pretty self explanatory.

See https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/base-types/custom-date-and-time-format-strings for info about the formats you can use. Don’t do what I did and miss the distinction between lowercase ‘m’ (minute) and uppercase ‘M’ (month) *facepalm*

Record Rename/Modify Considerations

TL;DR

Use table extensions to extend the OnModify trigger rather than OnBefore/AfterModify subscriptions where possible. If you must use subscribers then be aware of some of the unexpected situation they are called in.

One of those situations is when a related table has been renamed. The Modify events are thrown in secondary tables e.g. if an Item record is renamed than all of its Item Ledger Entry records will have OnBeforeModifyEvent and OnAfterModifyEvent fired.

Record Modification

If you need to hang some custom logic off the back of a record modification (in a standard table) then I think you’ve got three main options:

  1. Create a table extension and add an OnModify trigger
  2. Add a subscription to the OnBeforeModifyEvent or OnAfterModifyEvent for the table in question
  3. Subscribe to the events in the Global Triggers codeunit to set the table mask and listen for modifications on the table you are interested in

In general I think that is the order of preference i.e. if you can use a table extension, do.

Why Use Events Then?

This isn’t really the point of this post – but why might you use events then. In short, when you can’t use a table extension. That will usually be for one of two reasons:

  1. The modify trigger isn’t called i.e. the base app calls Modify(false)
  2. You don’t know which tables you want to work with at design time – your app has got some setup to determine which tables to support maybe in some integration scenario or like Change Log Setup

Considerations For Modify Subscriptions

OK, you’ve decided to use event subscriptions to the OnBefore/AfterModify events. Now to the point of the post. There are some things you need to be aware of:

  • They are called for temporary records – most of our subscribers start with a Rec.IsTemporary() check
  • They are called whether or not the modify trigger has been called – the RunTrigger parameter indicates whether Modify(true) or Modify(false) was called
  • You need to explicitly call Rec.Modify if you make any changes to Rec with an OnAfterModifyEvent subscription otherwise your changes will not be persisted

What’s in a Rename?

You probably knew all of that anyway, What I didn’t know until today is that the events are fired if a parent table is renamed. For example, if you rename an Item record then these events will be fired for each Item Ledger Entry record. Which makes sense and might be exactly what you want.

We hadn’t thought of that and it was the cause of a bug in our app. Shame on us.

(Slightly) More Elegant Error Handling in Business Central

This is an intro post to the Error Message Mgt. codeunit and related objects. NAV has never brilliant when it comes to error handling, for a couple of reasons.

  1. The error messages themselves sometimes leave a lot to be desired
  2. The whac-a-mole nature of fixing multiple errors by finding one at a time and attempting to post/register again

There isn’t a lot we can do about the standard error messages, but we can write more considerate errors for our users. Describe the problem and guide the user to the solution as much as possible i.e. not “There was nothing to handle”.

What about #2? What if we could line up all the moles so that the user could whack them all in one go?1 We can use the Error Message Management objects to do just that.

This is a useful post you could take a look at – http://www.mynavblog.com/2019/04/09/how-to-write-error-and-confirm/ – but even having read that I still struggled my way through how to use it and write tests around it. I didn’t find the framework particularly easy or intuitive to work with so hope I can save someone else some head-scratching.

1 metaphorical moles. I’m not endorsing whacking actual moles.

Scenario

You might want to use this framework when you’ve got some process that could throw errors for multiple different reasons. Usually these are going to be some posting or registering routine for a journal line or a document.

Often there are all sorts of things that can wrong with those routines – posting date ranges, dimension errors, mandatory fields that have not been populated, missing posting setup, missing no. series… blah blah blah.

Rather than just throwing an error for the first problem we encounter we want to collect them together so that the user can fix them before posting again.

I was going to attempt a single overview post, but I’ve decided against that. I think it will be more useful (hopefully) to work through an example – albeit a silly one – in stages. I’ve got a small app for posting a record of video calls – because that’s what we need right now, more video calls and more admin.

The app adds a journal page to record the platform (Teams, Zoom, WhatsApp or Skype) the type of call, date, duration and participants. Before the journal can be posted there is a deliberately convoluted process to check for various errors. Concisely summarised below:

  1. No. of Participants must not be 0
  2. Duration (mins) must not be 0
  3. Posting Date must not be blank
  4. Posting Date must be within allowed posting dates for the user
  5. Zoom calls cannot be over 40 minutes when the No. of Participants is > 2 – I’m a cheapskate and have got a free account
  6. Teams cannot be used for a call type of Family Quiz – surely no family is that corporate?
  7. WhatsApp should not be used for groups of more than 4 – it’s bad enough with 2
  8. WhatsApp should not be used for a call type of Customer Demo – I mean, you don’t…do you?
  9. Skype isn’t used for more than 2 participants – I know technically it can be…it just isn’t
  10. Family quizzes can’t be held Monday – Thursday
  11. A call type of Daily Team Call cannot be more than 45 minutes long – you need to find a smaller team to have daily calls with
  12. A call type of Daily Team Call cannot have more than 30 participants – see #11

While this is daft, it is an example of how a journal might not be able to be posted for lots of different reasons. Normally we expect the user to fix those errors one at a time and, if they’ve still got the will to live, post the batch when they have resolved them all.

At the moment I’m just using Testfield and Error to throw errors when a journal line is valid. Over the next few posts I’m going to see if I can the Error Message Mgt objects to build a list of errors and display them all at once. Then we’re going to talk about how to test this behaviour.

The source code is here: https://github.com/jimmymcp/error-message-mgt Disclaimer: it sucks. This is an example of using the error handling tools, not of how to write a good journal.

Sales Header Posting

In the meantime, if you want to see an example of this sort of error collection in the base application then look at SendToPosting on the Sales Header table.

ErrorMessageMgt.Activate(ErrorMessageHandler);
ErrorMessageMgt.PushContext(ErrorContextElement, RecordId, 0, '');
IsSuccess := CODEUNIT.Run(PostingCodeunitID, Rec);
if not IsSuccess then
  ErrorMessageHandler.ShowErrors;

Then in the Sales-Post codeunit you’ll see this kind of thing (this from CheckAndUpdate)

ErrorMessageMgt.PushContext(ErrorContextElement, RecordId, 0, CheckSalesHeaderMsg);
CheckMandatoryHeaderFields(SalesHeader);
if GenJnlCheckLine.IsDateNotAllowed("Posting Date", SetupRecID) then
  ErrorMessageMgt.LogContextFieldError(...);